Fun Bookish & Artsy Olympic Facts + GIVEAWAY

The Olympics can be an exciting time (if you are the US Women’s gymnastic team), a not so exciting time (if you are watching the Olympic Darts competition at 1a.m.).  Regardless, it has along and esteemed history, with the occasional scandal thrown in that inevitably peaks everyone’s interest.  Despite what Mitt Romney may have to say about this year’s London Olympics, things are going swimmingly smooth thus far.  Even the whole badminton drama was dealt with to great results- everyone is now aware that badminton is actually an official Olympic sport…so, success all around.

I have decided that there is enough coverage of the athletic side of the Olympics and want to point out some of the intellectual side.  Now, of course, one could argue that is takes great intellectual perseverance and dedication to function at such a high physical level- and I will not dismiss that in the least.  However, here are a few fun facts and randomness that take the sport out of the games:

– Between 1912 and 1948, literature, art, and music were considered Olympic events and were cutthroat competitions during the games.  This tradition, while not official, is being carried on this year with an Olympic Art in the Park installment in London during the games.

– East Tennessee State University has a course titled ‘Olympic Games and Literature,’ focusing on all literary representations and aspects of the Olympic games.

– The French Olympic team has an secret unfair advantage this year that has been uncovered:  Baudelaire!  For a lovely satirical account of this breaking news, read this article at Melville House Books.

– Rumor has it that George Michael is set to preform at the closing ceremony on Sunday.  No word on how exactly this was the logical choice.  I guess we just have to have ‘Faith’ that he actually possesses enough talent.

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I am giving away a copy of Gold by Chris Cleave, a tale of the path to Olympic glory.  Below is a summary:

What would you sacrifice for the people you love? Kate and Zoe met at nineteen when they both made the cut for the national training program in track cycling—a sport that demands intense focus, blinding exertion, and unwavering commitment. They are built to exploit the barest physical and psychological edge over equally skilled rivals, all of whom are fighting for the last one tenth of a second that separates triumph from despair.

Now at thirty-two, the women are facing their last and biggest race: the 2012 Olympics. Each wants desperately to win gold, and each has more than a medal to lose.

Echoing the adrenaline-fueled rush of a race around the Velodrome track, Gold is a triumph of superbly paced, heart-in-throat storytelling. With great humanity and glorious prose, Chris Cleave examines the values that lie at the heart of our most intimate relationships, and the choices we make when lives are at stake and everything is on the line.

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If you would like to be entered to win, simply comment on this post with the following:

1.   Your e-mail address in the message

2.  How you follow and username/e-mail you follow under

3.  Tell me: If you could make anything an Olympic sport, what would it be?

 I will choose a winner by random on August 16, 2012.

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10 thoughts on “Fun Bookish & Artsy Olympic Facts + GIVEAWAY

  1. I follow by email: natasha_donohoo_8 at hotmail dot com
    I would choose reading too. Thanks for the chance to win!

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